A TEENAGER who was born with dwarfism is fulfilling her dream of becoming a professional horse rider and says it has helped her accept her disability. Megan Gregory, from Croydon, was born with Achondroplasia – a type of dwarfism that affects the growth of arms and other long bones. In addition to this, Megan has a frontal bossing on the top of her head and ‘trident' hands, meaning they all measure to the same size.The 19-year-old spent her school years being bullied but after taking up horse riding and started to compete two years ago, she has new-found confidence. Megan lives a normal life despite her disability, admitting she has “always liked a challenge”.


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A woman ended up in hospital with horrific facial injuries after her horse fell into a pothole on a country road.

Sherrie Hopwood was left with nasty cuts to her lips, nose and forehead after the fall near Daisy Nook Country Park in Oldham, Greater Manchester.

The 57-year-old had taken her horse Jay for a ride around the Daisy Nook bridal path when it stepped into the pothole on Crime Lane, which was full of water.

Businesswoman Sherrie said the horse's knees gave way and it fell, sending her crashing face first into the ground.

Speaking about the incident, which happened on April 4, Sherrie said: 'I was flat on my face, I tried shouting for help but there was no one around.
 
'I managed to force myself up to get up. I was very lucky because Jay didn't panic. If she had, she could have killed me.'
Sherrie was later taken to hospital, while Jay suffered cuts to the knees and legs and was checked over by a vet... READ MORE
 
Published in Articles
Monday, 22 January 2018 12:42

"Ohh, Mother"

There are plenty of things that we say and do which I’m sure our horses think are totally ridiculous. I sometimes imagine I can hear Archie sighing “Ohh Mother” in a similar tone to how a bored teenager would express their exasperation to an embarrassing parent. For example…

• We insist on an excessive amount kisses and hugs. A hello one, a goodbye one, one when you’ve had to tell them off and now feel guilty…

• We fight the eternal battle against mud and stable stains when quite frankly a roll appears to be the preferred activity at all times.

• We get hyped up about a competition for which we spend month preparing and then approximately 10 minutes actually showing what we can do.

• We turn up with fancy colour coordinated kit and exclaim at how much they must love it when in fact their eyesight has pretty limited colour vision.

• We put words in their mouths (a prime example being the title of this blog!) when in reality all they probably care about is who is delivering the next meal.

The relationship between humans and horses has had a long, sometimes stormy, but often beautiful history. It’s safe to say that a lot of our behaviour makes no sense to them but they are kind enough to tolerate our foibles and love us anyway!

joae150As it says on the tin, this is a personal blog about the journey Archie and I are taking in discovering the world of eventing. Archie is a 6 year old Irish gelding, and I am a 26 year old horse addict. I didn’t grow up in a family with horses, and Archie was the first horse I ever owned, having loaned for over 20 years. I hope that we can show other riders who perhaps don’t feel that they can achieve their dreams, that anything is possible!
 
 
Re-published by kind permission of Journey of an Amateur Eventer|Blog
Published in Trot On Blogs
Wednesday, 10 January 2018 15:42

Get Off Your High Horse!

At Trot On HQ recently, someone used the term 'get off your high horse!' Along with terms such as 'needs reining in' or 'had a leg up' it's a term used in everyday conversation that comes from mans long association with horses. Anyway, it started a discussion on why the idea of being 'on a high horse' still has relevance for equestrians today and whether it comes saddled with negative consequences.

When you accuse someone of being on their high horse, it means you're accusing them of acting in a superior manner, usually a moral one. And being actually mounted on a high horse not only puts you physically above others but also can make other people feel that 'you' think you are above them in status. Let's face it, because of the horse's historic association with the rich and powerful, lots of people still hold the opinion that anyone who owns a horse is rich, stuck up, and thinks 'they are better than the rest of us!' When of course we all know that the majority of us certainly aren't wealthy and scrimp and scrape to plough all of our hard-earned cash into our beloved horse.

Is it for instance, one of the reasons why other road users can be so aggressive towards horse and riders on the road? And whilst there are anti-hunt protesters who genuinely don't want to see any animal harmed, there are those who are more people haters rather than animal lovers because they regard riders as part of the upper classes who think they are 'above the rest.'

What do you think?


 

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Dragged across a road by her horse after he was spooked by mindless dirt bikers, teenager Megan Hill feels lucky to be alive.

What should have been a pleasant daily ride turned into a nightmare for the 17-year-old who ended up being dragged semi conscious behind horse Sox.

The teenager told how idiot bikers frightened the seven year old gelding which bolted, leaving Megan with a shattered ankle, bruised pelvis and other injuries.

 “They don’t have any common sense. Before when I’ve been on that track, riders have been coming towards us.

“Some have no respect and come flying up from behind us.”

Mum, Kelly added: “We could understand if these riders didn’t see them, but they’ve come back at them again - it’s unbelievable.

“They need to think of the consequences of what could have happened.”   READ MORE

Northumbria Police is investigating the incident, and anyone with information is urged to call 101 quoting reference number 769 28 12 17.

 

 
 
Published in Articles
Monday, 27 November 2017 10:37

Keep Dreaming

When your dreams come true, sometimes they don’t look quite like you imagined. Years of yearning can mean that reality can be a little harsh, and the inevitable complications that come all too often with horses can be challenging. I spent twenty years learning to ride on riding school horses and having other people’s horses on loan, but during that time I dreamed of a horse to call my own. It wasn’t until two years ago that I was finally able to buy Archie, but it wasn’t all smooth sailing…

In the early days Archie was a scrawny 5 year old who was full of potential but also full of quirks. He refused to lead, regularly planting himself on the yard and steadfastly refusing to move. The embarrassing sweaty argument that ensued was miserable for all involved and often meant it could take ten minutes to walk the twenty metres to the arena.
A dirty, scrawny but beautifully dappled 5 year old Archie once we finally made it to the arena!

A grey who is scared of water sounds like a terrible idea right? Indeed it was! He was petrified of the stuff, and being the worst colour of all a bath could easily take up to two hours with a sponge and endless reassurance. He was also scared of the hose and spray (spray bottles being an issue we still haven’t quite cracked!) so washing off legs and summer rinse downs were challenging.

Being young and fairly inexperienced I knew I had work to do on his schooling, and our first challenge was the  left canter lead which Archie didn’t know existed. He was always  more balanced on the right and he would chose it every time no matter how many different ways I asked. I was also stronger on my right side which made everything more tricky, and it took weeks of work to get him to even think about cantering comfortably on the left.

Apart from a fear of spray bottles most of theses quirks have now been ironed out. We have had a whole host more problems since then but we have worked on our differences and we understand each other better. A lot of hard work and even more love has meant that Archie has become the horse of my dreams; my horse of a lifetime. I’m lucky because I know it doesn’t always work out that way. When I first realised this dream it didn’t look quite like I expected it to, but two years on it is everything I imagined it could be. Keep dreaming, and one day your dreams will come true!
 
 

Re-published by kind permission of Journey of an Amateur Eventer|Blog

 
 
Published in Trot On Blogs

An 'out of control' Rottweiler is seen chasing and barking at horses in Oxford.

The incident was recorded by Tracy Smith, 40, an experienced horse rider.

She says dog owners need to be educated more on safety around bigger animals.

Dogs should be kept on leads and in ear shot of owners when a horse is nearby.

A mum in Oxford has revealed terrifying footage of an 'out of control' Rottweiler chasing her teenage daughter's horse for more than three minutes.

Tracy Smith's daughter, Ella, 14, clung on in fear when the large dog repeatedly darted at her horse, barking as it chased them in circles near their home on August, 12.

Mrs Smith, 40, who shot the film, was thankful her daughter is an experienced rider, particularly after a similar incident left a friend with broken ribs, she said... READ MORE
 
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What a gentleman! Realising the horses may be spooked by his trailbike, this motorbike-rider thoughtfully turned off the engine and inqured as how best to pass... he had polos in his pocket too. RESULT!

The bike rider is James Higgs and his video has gone viral with over 1,0000 views on social media.

He keeps his bikes on a livery yard so he is used to encountering horses.

“I’ve hacked out a few times as a beginner but stopped after I injured my knee in a fall, which hurt a great deal more than any fall I have had whilst riding motorcycles,” he added. “You horse riders really are some tough people.”

Thank you, James.


 

 

Published in Trot On Blogs
Wednesday, 26 April 2017 09:24

Why do race horses love the beach?

• It's healthy for horses to have down time away from the stables

• Sand is soft underfoot and low impact on horse's joints

•Seawater soothes skin and muscles


 

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A petition has been started to clarify the law on animal-on-animal attacks after a horse was almost killed by a dog and its owner was injured.

Emily Bunton started the online petition which will be considered for debate in parliament if it reaches 100,000 signatures.

On the 15th of February 2017 two horses and a rider were viciously attacked by a Staffordshire Bull Terrier, causing one of the horses to undergo 6.5 hours of veterinary attention due to the severity of its wounds.

One rider was also bitten, casing deep muscle damage to her right calf.

The police informed the riders that no criminal offence had been committed, as it was deemed that the dog was not behaving dangerously before it attacked, and that there was no way of knowing if the dog intended to bite the rider - making it impossible to determine if this was an animal on animal attack or an animal on human attack.

The petition aims to bring attention to the need to tighten the laws surrounding dog attacks on horses to lessen the ambiguity surrounding animal on animal attacks.

Please sign the petiton HERE


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